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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> jim, two concerns here right now. we're told that those flames are somewhat under control, there's worry about the toxicity of the air, ammonia compounds still in the air, evacuations nearby. also concern about a second fertilizer tank that could explode, presumably a massive type explosion like we already saw. what can you tell us about these dual concerns right now from where you're at? >> reporter: that's still a concern the fires are not out. yes, they're under control. yes, they are contained within the plant, the fertilizer factory that blew up, but, yes, there is that tank inside there that still contains some ammonia or some of the product that's being produced there. if they were to catch fire, there could be an explosion. if they were to be ruptured, there could be a leak of toxic fumes out into the community. the wind has been blowing quite strongly from the south for most of the day that may be shifting around this evening. that causes concern for people who live farther to the south including in waco, about 20 miles away. >> now, jim, the mayor of west texas is a fir
with jim davis, executive director of the colorado department of public safety. he's also chair of the national governor's association homeland security advisors council. among big events he's worked on was the 2008 democratic national convention in denver. and ed cannon, currently of t&m protection resources, a private security consulting firm. he was formerly an assistant chief of the new york city police department, and helped set up security for that city's marathon and many other events. well, jim davis, starting with you, how does boston change things for people in your position? what kinds of discussions are going on now? >> well, certainly we're much more focused on security. you know, in the united states we've got pretty short memories and i think after 9/11 we were very focused on security and then things kind of we'd go through a time period where we don't a lot of attacks or any successful attacks and now boston happens and people get focused on it again. i think that in the -- in law enforcement and intelligence community we've always been focused on it but people
torrential rains hit the area. a swollen river is forcing evacuations and road closures in some areas. jim spellman is live in peoria, illino illinois. it looks bad where you are. that water seems pretty high. >> about 14 feet above where it normally is right now, fredricka. this is the illinois river. it goes right through the heart of peoria, illinois. this building, the historic river station trying to keep dry. they're pumping out rooms in there. you can see people here are doing everything they can to try to prepare for another two feet or so of water. here in downtown peoria along the waterfront, they have erected this sort of handmade levy. sand bags over walls. they predict the water is going to get to just about here. if their predictions are right, they're hoping most of the businesses here are going to be okay. if their predictions are off, if any more rain comes or is higher than they predict, it will be trouble for the businesses. we were up in neighboring peoria heights, illinois. several businesses under water there. with 2 more feet to go in that part of illinois, there's g
wants a review by the intelligence committee. jim acosta joins us now from capitol hill. jim, what did she say exactly? >> well, anderson, senator feinstein, who is the chair of the senate intelligence committee, she did not say that the fbi dropped the ball. she didn't want to go that far, but she does want a review of what the fbi knows about all this and to get at what tamerlan tsarnaev was up to when he went back to russia back in 2012. he apparently made a trip there. and this was after he was apparently interviewed by the fbi back in 2011. the fbi said in a statement friday night that it had been asked to investigate tamerlan's ties to potential terror groups, to potential militant groups and that during that inquiry the fbi interviewed tamerlan. and so senator feinstein and some other senators here on capitol hill want to know how is it that tamerlan tsarnaev was able to travel to russia last year for six months and how did he get back into the country given all of that information? and so senator feinstein says there will be a hearing on this perhaps as early as tomorrow to get
declared disaster areas in more than 40 counties. cnn's jim spellman is in illinois where the river has been overflowing since sunday and residents they are they're preparing for even more water. >> the last thing they want to hear about here is another inch of rain coming. i'm not sure it will really make a huge difference. but take a look. two blocks in from the water and it's inundated here a foot up at the edge. three or four feet there at the worst. we haven't seen widespread reports of this kind of damage, but here in spring bay, it's having a huge impact. take a look. last minute prep in spring bay, illinois, as floodwaters inundate this riverside community. where is your home? >> my home is that gray and white mobile home with the black shutters on it. >> you can't get to your home by foot now? >> no. >> have you ever seen this much water come up here? >> no. >> scary? >> yep. >> the home, along with about 40 others in this trailer community, began to flood sunday and the water has continued to rise. >> yesterday i cried all day. >> reporter: and today? >> today i'm not crying y
tsavraev, at the request of the russian government. cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta joins us from washington now with what's going on. a lot of frustration, a lot of what ifs, could if this boston magnificent y massacre been prevented? those are the questions that will be brought forward today. >> that's right, wolf. it will be playing out on capitol hill. the senate intelligence committee has set a hearing for 2:30 this afternoon with fbi officials, they will be the lead briefers at this hearing. i'm told from a source of that committee. lawmakers want to find out if federal investigators somehow failed to see big red flags coming from tamerlan tsavraev. as lawmakers are praising authorities for the quick work in the boston bombing case, members of congress are still calling for hearings, into the fbi's handling of dead suspect tamerlan tsavraev, who traveled back to a dangerous region of russia, just last year. >> what did he do, when he went back for six months? sit in his aunt and uncle's home for six months or doing something else? and when he came back to this countr
have a number of reports this morning. to begin we hear from john miller and then jim axel rod. to begin we hear from john miller and then jim axel rod. >> reporter: it was a week of images, both frightening and inspiring. the chaos of a terrorist attack and the heroism of the response. in erie videos from security cameras we saw brothers tamerlan and dzhokhar tsarnaev allegedly on the way to place the bombs. and then the gripping 28-hour manhunt. there was an ambush that left a young police officer dead. and a gun battle that left a transit police officer badly wounded and ended the life of tamerlan tsarnaev. dzhokhar tsarnaev, his younger brother, was lost spotted in this infrared photo hiding inside a boat as the drag net closed in around him. his f.b.i. wanted poster now marked captured is the image that puts to a close the first chapter in the story of the boston marathon bombing. and so the next chapter opens with nothing but questions. questions posed by the president himself. >> why did young men who grew up and studied here as part of our communities and our country re
's turn back to the investigation and talk to jim walsh, an international security and terrorism expert at m.i.t. let's talk about law enforcement. what are they looking for now? how do they go about this investigation? take us through some of those steps? and within that, we have to start forming some theories. from what we know already, do you think that it is maybe an individual or probably a group and how do you go about figuring out, is this a foreign group or individual, or americans? >> yeah. those are big questions and there are a lot of them. let me start in the beginning and say in terms of the phase of the investigation, i think there are different parts and different parts of the government are handling different parts of the investigation. so obviously, the most important and immediate thing are those events and evidence that are near the attack. that are approximate to the attack. that includes the crime scene. that includes the material used in the bomb and the process of reconstructing what that bomb looked like. it is designed, the materials it used. the nature of the t
. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force. and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-america japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in light of history it was an error. and so today, this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this poi
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
promise to find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer. thank you, everybody. see you tomorrow! >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." let's get started right away. the big story today a shocking but fake tweet and from the associated press and set off a steep stock market selloff and then just as suddenly, a stock market rebound. what on earth happened? cnbc's own eamon javers joins us with this incredible story. good evening. >> it was a really bizarre turn of events starting at 1:07:00 p.m. here's the tweet that the a.p. account put out at that minute. it said, "breaking" two explosions in the white house and barack obama is injured. that was a fake report as a result of a hack attack against the a.p. twitter account. but it set off this reaction in the dow jones industrial average, as you see from the chart, a huge spike down on that news. down about 143 points at the bottom. and then bouncing right back up, all of that happening within the space of about three minutes. and by sheer coincidence, the white house briefing was set t
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
that an agreement and all the responsibility for the gaza strip and hamas? >> good question. >> jim, the microphone is coming. >> good to see you again. as you knoi m believer in when yowritwhen you said d so forgive me for what i'm about to say that i'm very frustrated middle east peace activist for those of you that money i've been involved in this for over 23 years trying to organize the churches in this area and have spoken in other parts of the country as well. so, with that in mind please forgive me because this is a harsh question you as well as everyone in this room i think you are all living in a fantasy and i am, too and here is the problem. in your presentation, you talked about the arab street and how connected they are and you're absolutely right. but you didn't with the public opinion in this country. you have got to. we are democracy and we are not disconnected from the public opinion. when you look as i have done at public opinion onisrael and palestine for the last 20 years, guess what, over 50% of americans support israel. less than 10% with a few exceptions, the war was one of th
, they may have done it there or may have had a region, a quantum leap there, as jim was talking about, where will you develop those bomb-making skills? you don't go to m.i.t. to learn,build pressure cooker bombs, do you go to the caucuses, do you go to that area of the world where these devices have been used successfully to attack humanity for year upon year upon year. so i think that six-month period, the russians help us in that we may be able to identify who he was working with and gone to perhaps some type of terroristic training, bomb making school. realize the two brothers set some place. they built multiple pressure cooker bombs, built these hand-held devices. they did a lot. we have had fwhoermts u.s. try to blow their underwear up, try to blow their shoes up, try to blow their car up and they weren't successful, thank god. >> you think this goes beyond what they could pick up on the internet? >> i do i do. i think somebody sitting over their shoulder neath needed to be done. i don't think it was looking a this the seven or eight-page manual you could pull out of inspiration the al
a jim demint exit at exit security system as well as economic conditions is a good thing. a variety of economic legislation in this are good on balance. >> i want america to win. >> me too. craig huey about how the u.s. is not using immigration policy effectively and as many other countries are to improve economic growth. what countries did you see as doing a good job? numbers, look at the it's in my written testimony, under core visas are for economic reasons at the moment. given the paramount need for economic growth, that cuts across our ability to deal with all our policy challenges, those will all be easier with faster economic growth. focusing on that makes more sense. other countries, we have charts in the written testimony, have a high percentage. other countries that have made reforms recently like the united kingdom looking to do this. if you look at the countries that are struggling right now and likely to fail, dejapan. europe, the exception is germany, which has undertaken a particular percentage of turkish labor. we have to recognize economic reality and adjust our pol
, that is the --. >> host: charles there is tweet relating to what you're saying. jim writes can an american citizen be considered an enemy combatant? >> guest: absolutely goes back to the civil war. goes certainly to world war ii. anwar al-awlaki was american-born. president obama use ad drone to kill him in the wilds of yemen. if you, if you fill eight yourself with enemy forces and you go to war against american citizens and you kill americans will fully and you do so on behalf of a movement or enemy forces then indeed you can be considered an enemy combatant. being a enemy combatant simply because you're an american citizen. if in world war ii you went over and joined nazi forces were you not a enemy combatant? of course you were. . . >> he didn't treat those terrible tragedies as access war, but appropriately treated them as heinous criminal acts to be investigated, prosecuted, and appropriately punishes. >> host: al-alwaki was an american citizen, kimed on orders of president obama. did president obama violate the constitution by doing that? >> guest: well, actually, we have a lawsuit in which
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)